Harper's Weekly 05/04/1872


Harper's Weekly
A Journal of Civilization.


Vol. XVI.—No. 801.] NEW YORK, SATURDAY, MAY 4, 1872. [SINGLE COPIES TEN CENTS.
$4,00 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE.


Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year 1872, by Harper & Brothers, in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.


SHAKESPEARE ON THE “LIBERAL” CAMPAIGN OF SLANDER.



C. S.“Now is the winter of our discontent
Made glorious summer by this sun of York;
And all the clouds, that lour'd upon our house,
In the deep bosom of the ocean buried.
Now are our brows bound with victorious wreaths;
Our bruised arms hung up for monuments;
Our stern alarums chang'd to merry meetings.
Why I, in this weak piping time of peace,
Have no delight to pass away the time;
Unless to spy my shadow in the sun,
And hate the idle pleasures of these days.
Plots have I laid, inductions dangerous.”
Richard III., Act I., Scene I.
Columbia.“O judgment, thou art fled to
brutish beasts,
And men have lost their reason!
They, that have done this deed, are honorable;
What private griefs they have, alas, I know
not,
That made them do it; they are wise and hon-
orable,
And will, no doubt, with reasons answer you.
I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts;
I am no orator, as Brutus is:
I tell you that which you yourselves do know.”
Julius Cćsar, Act III., Scene II.
C. S.“How now, how now? what say the
citizens?”
Trumbull“The citizens are mum, say not
a word.
I laid open all your victories,
Your discipline in war, wisdom in peace,
Your bounty, virtue, fair humility.
And, when my oratory grew to an end,
I bade them, that did love their country's good,
Cry,”Hurra for Schurz.
“They spake not a word;
But, like dumb statues, or breathless stones,
Star'd on each other, and look'd deadly pale.
When I had done, some followers of mine own,
At lower end `o' the hall, hurl'd up their caps,
And some ten voices cried, “Hurra for Schurz.
“And thus I took the vantage of those few,—
Thanks, gentle citizens, and friends, quoth I;
This general applause, and cheerful shout,
Argues your wisdom, and your love to” Carl:
“And even here brake off and came away.”
Richard III., Act III., Scene VII.H. G.
“Do you know me, my lord?”
Grant.
“Excellent well; you are a fish-
monger.”

H. G.
“Not I, my lord.”
Grant.
“Then I would you were so honest
man.”

H. G.
“Honest, my lord?”
Grant.
“Ay, sir; to be honest, as this world
goes, is to be one man picked out of ten thousand.”


H. G.
“That's very true ….. What do you
read, my lord?”

Grant.
“Words, words, words!”
H. G.
“What is the matter, my lord?”
Grant.
“Between who?”
H. G.
“I mean the matter that you read,
my lord.”

Grant.
“Slanders, Sir.”

Hamlet Act II., Scene II.

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